Mortgage Broker

Unless you live under a rock (like I do), you’ve probably heard the term “mortgage broker” get thrown around. You may have heard good things, and you may have heard bad things.

So how does this whole mortgage broker thing work?

Well, once a borrower makes contact with a mortgage broker and agrees to work with him or her, the broker will gather important information. Income, asset, and employment documentation, along with a credit report, are necessary to assess the borrower’s ability to obtain financing. A retail bank would collect the same documentation.

Once the mortgage broker has all the important details, they can determine what will work best for the borrower. This may include setting an appropriate loan amount, loan-to-value, and determining which loan type would be ideal for the borrower.

Of course, the borrower can decide on all these things on their own if they so choose. The broker is just there to help (and make their commission).

When all the details are ironed out, the broker will submit the loan to a lender they work with to gain approval. During the loan process, the broker will communicate with both the bank and the borrower to ensure everything runs smoothly.

If you use a broker, you won’t actually work directly with the bank. All correspondence will funnel through the broker and their staff.

Mortgage Brokers Can Shop Your Rate for You

After all the paperwork is taken care of, the mortgage broker will work on behalf of the borrower to find the best (lowest) mortgage rates available. This is the key advantage of a mortgage broker. They have the ability to shop with numerous banks and lenders simultaneously to find the lowest rate and/or the best loan program.

If you use a traditional retail bank, the loan officer can only offer loan programs and corresponding mortgage rates from a single bank. Clearly this would lessen your chances of seeing all that is out there. And who wants to apply more than once for a mortgage?

Keep in mind that the number of banks/lenders a mortgage broker has access to will vary, as brokers must be approved to work with each individually. In other words, one mortgage broker may have access to Wells Fargo’s wholesale mortgage rates, while another may not. The more options the better. So ask the broker for multiple quotes from as many lenders as possible.

Mortgage Brokers Are Your Loan Guide

Mortgage brokers work with borrowers throughout the entire loan process until the deal is closed. Overall, they’re probably a lot more available than loan officers at retail banks, since they work with fewer borrowers on a more personal level.

This is another big advantage over a retail bank. If you go with one of the big banks, you may spend most of your time on hold waiting to get in touch with a representative. Additionally, if your loan is declined, that’s the end of the line. With a mortgage broker, they’d simply apply at another bank.

Mortgage brokers were largely blamed for the mortgage crisis because they originated loans on behalf of numerous banks and weren’t paid based on loan performance.

Studies have shown that these originate-to-distribute loans have performed worse than loans funded via traditional channels. But the big banks were the ones that created the loan programs and made them available, so ultimately the blame lies with them.

Regardless, you shouldn’t get yourself caught up in the blame game. It is recommended that you contact both retail banks and mortgage brokers to ensure you adequately shop your mortgage. Most borrowers only obtain a single mortgage quote, which certainly isn’t doing your due diligence.